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SKU# DSWS-EF-PBR-ALP-AFPP

elitefts™ 2X3 Power Bench Rack

Regular Price: $1,499.00

Special Price $1,349.10

This unique design adds another level to your bench. This bench is packed with floor press features and is sure to not only look good but perform better than any bench rack on the market. 

Call Out Features:

  • Small Footprint - 33L" x 49" x 54H
  • Competition Bench Specs 
  • Drop-In pads
  • Center Gripper Pad
  • Low Cut J-Cups 

If you are looking for custom options click HERE

Usually ships in 6-8 weeks. Partially assembled. AK, HI, and international orders, please call for a shipping quote. Partially Assembled Freight Shipped.Learn More
Specs
Features * Footprint - 33L" x 49" x 54H"

* Center Pad - 12.5" x 17"

* Removable Side pads - 14" X 30

* J-Cups and spotter arms

* Band peg options available

* Step up spotter platform

* 2x3 11-gauge steel

* Lag points for bolting

* 1/2 inch hole diameter

* 1 inch hole spacing

* Required Fields

* Required Fields

elitefts 2x3 Power Bench Rack

This unique design adds another level to your bench. This bench is packed with floor press features and is sure to not only look good but perform better than any bench rack on the market. 

 

Benefits:

  • Small Footprint
  • Competition Bench Press Specs
  • Pin Presses
  • Floor Presses
  • Reverse Band Presses
  • Isometric Work
  • Cross-post set back to allow Room to tuck and arch set up
  • Low cut J-cups allows for better lat activation with set up
  • Rod and Pipe Pins (helps to keep bars from bending with pin presses)

 

Specs:

  • Footprint - 33L" x 49" x 54H"
  • Center Gripper Pad - 12.5" x 17" 
  • Removable Drop-In Side Pads - 14" X 30
  • J-Cups and spotter arms
  • 2x3, 11-gauge steel
  • Lag points for bolting
  • 1/2 inch hole diameter
  • 1-inch hole spacing
If you are looking for custom options click HERE

 

 

Story Time: 

This is something Dave Tate had tossed together for our warehouse gym. When asked about it he told us that it's based on the Stand Press he used to do in 2006 where he would pile up boxes on each side of the Bench Rack to simulate a floor press while still being able to maintain leg drive and tightness. 

While visiting one of our manufactures over the summer he saw we had an extra bench rack sitting to the side and asked them to build drop-in pads to it, with other modifications. 

A few weeks later, this new bench rack arrived and another winner was born. What we didn’t expect was after posting a picture of it, so many others asking how to buy one. It was simply made so Dave can do what... Dave does.

Why did he originally do this?

This is straight from his Blog. 

This movement can serve many purposes. The one I’m going to write about for you here is to help the bottom technical end of the bench press. ⁣

⁣Many will say this is like a floor press while on a bench. I disagree because I feel the legs should be straight on a floor press to take them out of the press. With the stand press, your legs are still in the movement. ⁣

The biggest technical training aspect is not allowing the elbows to drop lower than the center bench pad. I believe the best way to keep your shoulders healthy is to not let the elbows drop lower than the bench pad. For most, a good start is even to the pad - thus, the same arm position as the floor. If your torso is big and/or arms are short, bring the stand up higher. ⁣

You want the bar to be 1-2 inches off of your chest while triceps are on the side pads. From here, you want to figure out what you need to do to get the bar to touch your torso. In other words, bring your torso to the bar while keeping your ass on the bench. This can be done by pulling more air in the belly (or chest - or both), driving your heals down if you tuck, and packing shoulders down.  If legs are out, it could be pushing through your heals instead of toes. ⁣


It could also be your back tightness, or how high you are positioned on your traps and rear deltoids. It could be many of these together.⁣

The thing is, when you find the most optimal position, the bar will be on your chest because you figured out how to get your torso to meet the bar on the way down. ⁣

This leads to less shoulder rotation, a stronger bench, a tighter bench, shorter push, and a healthier position to press from.⁣

 

Another training aspect includes the development of greater starting strength from the bottom (going from a static to a dynamic),

⁣This can be used as max effort work, submaximal training, dynamic effort work, or simply just a teaching tool.⁣ The options are endless. 

 

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