Setting Up Your Training Plan During the Apocalypse

TAGS: training setup, Home Training, Marc Keys, apocalypse

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Finally, once we have looked at how we are going to retain the performance element of our training as best as we can with the equipment available to us, we can look at setting up some habits that might be beneficial going forward. Having worked with a mixture of different athletes, one of the biggest differences I see with powerlifting and other sports is the sheer lack of cross-training that lifters utilize. I am massively guilty of this myself, and it is something I have been improving (around my injuries), which has been helping massively. Generally speaking, there are two ways of looking at or engaging in this cross-training:

  1. Cross-training through other training methods
  2. Cross-training using targeted conditioning work

The first method comes with the benefit of being more accountable since you'll be in a group setting (post lockdown). It will be led by an expert who may push you more than you might think. It comes with the downside of perhaps being more expensive (paying for a second monthly membership); however, this can easily be circumvented via finding videos on Youtube. Another downside, and probably the main downside, is that it's going to be very general. If you do Pilates or yoga to cross-train for your sport, you are going to get a lot of benefit from the focus on core, glute, and shoulder-based strength for powerlifting as well as the mobilization/encouragement of movement. However, you'll be doing 60 minutes of exercise, whereas 5-10 minutes of it is going to be relevant or targeted to your weaknesses. 


Part 1: Goal Setting and Adjusting Your Nutritional Plan During the Apocalypse

Part 2: How to Adapt Your Training and Plyometrics During the Apocalypse

Part 3: Remaining Jacked and Tanned During the Apocalypse

Part 4: Setting Up Your Training Plan During the Apocalypse


The second method involves paying an expert, such as a physiotherapist, to have a look at you objectively and see where you are deficient in strength or condition. This is typically done ad hoc after you have suffered from an injury or issue and have rehabbed back to health. You will have exercises to help keep your strength up and to stop an overload injury occurring in your training again. A common practice in a professional or elite sport is for athletes to either have a generic "prehab" routine or to have a set individual battery of exercises or top-up conditioning designed to help strengthen their weak points. Hence, they're more robust and trainable. This style of conditioning has the advantage of being specific to you as an athlete or to your sport, therefore, cutting down on wasted time. It has the negative of being driven by you the athlete, so consequently, you are way more likely to either skip it entirely or to half-ass it since there is no one on hand to keep you accountable.

Here are the things you can try out and do in the coming days and weeks to try and help you become a better conditioned and robust athlete.

If you were to choose training philosophies or methods that are of benefit or complementary to lifting, then yoga or Pilates would be my top picks (try online Pilates/Yoga classes or YouTube videos). They focus on general mobility and movement (more relevant to yoga) and strength in the hips, shoulder, and core (relevant to both but probably more relevant to Pilates). They aren't going to double down on the stresses we are already putting our body through in our training. With circuit training or more general training like CrossFit, there can be a lot of doubling down on movement patterns and movements that are already undergoing a lot of stress. Like the use of press up training when ⅓, if not more, of your training time and stress is focused on bench pressing and assistance around the upper body. Pilates and yoga tend to focus more on isometric, tempo-based movement around the shoulder with more of an effect around the rotator cuff and motor control around the joint. Pilates and yoga will have more of a complementary training adaptation as opposed to doubling up on training stress we're already getting in our programs.

Trying some general conditioning work for powerlifting, you can utilize resources such as The Barbell Physio, Rodger's Reset, or Strength Coach Therapy on Instagram or online to get some ideas or routines you can carry out in adjunction with your training. You can also look below to see what we've found to be a deficit in lifters. The below are just anecdotally what we have found to be the case with the athletes and lifters we train. If you want more specific or detailed feedback, then I would highly recommend seeking out a physiotherapist or an athletic trainer who specializes in dealing with lifting populations. 

Shoulder

Commonly in the shoulder, it would appear rotator cuff strength is the most common issue with weightlifters, powerlifters, and strongmen.

Shoulder Exercises

  • Side plank arms straight
  • Sacap angels
  • Iron Scap band exercises
  • Side plank pull-throughs
  • Shoulders taps

Frequency - 3-6x per week, 2-4 exercises per session.

Progress load, time or reps, and keep exercises at a solid RPE 9.

Hip

For lifters with a lack of strength in adductor (possibly more relevant for sumo pullers) and glute med/hip flexor seems to be common areas of deficiency.

Hip Exercises

  • Adductor plank
  • Adductor raise
  • Lying side leg lift (add band for resistance)
  • Lying leg lift (add band for resistance)
  • Hip flexor extensions (add band to increase resistance)

Frequency - 3-6x per week, 2-4 exercises per session.

Progress load, time or reps keep exercises at a solid RPE 9

Knee

Quad strength seems to be important work on for a lot of lifters. Still, training load is probably more relevant for knee-related issues as they tend to be tendinopathy or tendonitis. It's best managed first with pain and load management (the training load) and then using methods such as heavy, slow resistance training to help to improve the quality of the tendon.

Knee Exercises

  • Step up with slow eccentric (keep all weight on the front leg don't push off with back leg)
  • Pistol squat to bench
  • Pistol squat with trailing leg
  • Knee extensions with band or machine
  • Leg Press
  • Slow tempo box squats

Frequency: 2-3x per week, 2-3 exercises per session.

Progress load, time or reps, and keep exercises at a solid RPE 9.

Back

Back pain is widespread, not just in lifters but with the population in general. As a general rule of thumb, the best thing you can do for back pain is to get it and to keep it moving. Sedentary lifestyle factors will only make the back pain worse or help it to persist. With training, you should first look to avoid painful movement and then reintroduce training with lower load, higher rep, and slower tempo to reduce the force demand, which lessens the stress on you and your back but will allow you to still train hard.

Back Exercises

  • Cat/Camel (mobility)
  • Mckenzie press up (mobility)
  • Childs pose (mobility)
  • Bird dog progressions (strength)
  • Dead Bug progressions (strength)

Frequency (multiple times daily for mobility work and 2-3x per week for strength work)

Do key mobility exercises in a circuit format a few times during the day, especially if you work a sedentary job.

Progression is to just keep on top of the mobility and to progress the strengthening work to RPE 9 and to keep challenging it.

Increasing your general physical preparation and keeping your training interesting while you can't train at a gym

Depending on your training goals and your equipment availability, you might want to include some more general preparation work or cardiovascular work into your program. You should probably be reasonably sparing with the introduction of this kind of work and take it at your own time. There is no need to go from one extreme to the other. Including regular lower-level intensity, cardio is a good idea. Set up a tangible goal of getting in your 10,000 steps a day either before a certain time or during your outdoor exercise (if permissible in your area) can be a good thing to do not just for your general fitness but also for your mental health.

If you want to change tact and try to improve your aerobic fitness during the following period, you can utilize a mixture of running, walking, cycling and circuit training to help to develop your conditioning and cardiovascular system. Before you start jumping on the CrossFit workouts without thinking about how you are going to implement it, you should understand some very simple conditioning principles.

Central Adaptation

Central adaptations refer to adaptation of the heart and lungs to exercise training. This kind of training will make you fitter in every aspect of your life and sport. Your cardiovascular system has a MASSIVE ability to train, adapt, and recover. It also will adapt and improve with both low-intensity exercise and high-intensity exercise. Higher intensity exercise will drive more peripheral adaptation (we will discuss this briefly next) while your heart and lungs will get better with any kind of training. There is no need to drive yourself into the ground to get into good shape. If anything, by taking your time and developing your aerobic base (central adaptation, i.e., heart and lungs) first as a priority, you will be way fitter and more adaptable in the long run. 

Peripheral Adaptation

Peripheral adaptations happen at the level of the muscle cells and enzymes in use during exercise. An example of which is cycling will develop the muscular endurance in your quadriceps and the enzymes (ability to produce energy and clear waste products) and the capillarization (density of blood vessels and ability to deliver blood to working muscle cells). Generally speaking, these adaptations will be more specific to the task you are trying to get fitter for. So if you're wanting to become fitter at running, for instance, you will only really develop the ability of your calves, hamstrings, and glutes to maintain a steady running gait by running.

What are you looking to get out of your conditioning training?

For a lot of us, we might be viewing this as a chance to become a bit fitter, lose weight, and generally not feel like shit. We don't need to become broken and sore all of the time to achieve this end goal. To develop your overall conditioning and to get in better shape, you should be looking more at your daily activity and your daily energy intake (read diet) to put yourself into a slight deficit. It is also a marathon and not a sprint, so there is little to be gained in smashing your pan in five days of the week and then making a cunt of two. Your net effort over the seven days every week is what counts.

When it comes to your conditioning, we are going to focus on building a sustainable approach. You can utilize some more intense protocols if you want to get a feeling like you are working hard. It is a lot easier to get a good endocrine rush doing conditioning training than doing bodyweight or low load based resistance training. It can help to keep you engaged with what you are doing to do a couple of harder/more intense conditioning sessions, but there is no need to train like that every session to see any improvement in your fitness. If anything, it is counterproductive as you just wind up in a state of overreach and will end up having to give up either from fatigue or overuse injury.

For lifters, I would recommend you have the majority of your conditioning stick to low intensity, low impact activity. Do it regularly, ideally every day in the form of walking, cycling, or recovery-based circuits.

If you want to incorporate harder interval based work, you should look to do this 1-3x per week. The more used to this kind of training you are, generally the more you can do. If you are new to it, I would recommend doing one session for 2-3 weeks, and then incorporating a second session. There isn't much need to get up to 3-4x interval based sessions unless you are looking to get into a sport where fitness is essential.

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Setting Up Your Training Week

Now that we have looked at the various elements of training, here's what we can do while limited to training with no or limited equipment.

Weekly Structure 

Day 1 - Plyometric and high force-based session, easy aerobic-based conditioning (option)

Day 2 - Hypertrophy based workout, hard conditioning session (optional)

Day 3 - Control and muscular endurance based session, easy aerobic-based conditioning (option)

Day 4 - Plyometric and high force-based session, easy aerobic-based conditioning (option)

Day 5 - Hypertrophy based workout, hard conditioning session (optional)

Day 6 - Control and muscular endurance based session, easy aerobic-based conditioning (option)

Day 7 - Active recovery

We should try and do the plyometric or force-based work when we are freshest, so at the start of the training week and after the easiest day of the week (Day 3 + 6 have more of a general physical preparation theme focusing on prehab/yoga/pilates and easier conditioning). We are also localizing the harder work into two days in the week. This is the messier session where there may be some cross over in terms of energy systems involved and muscles being used. So we are going to plan these followed by the easiest days following.

Session Ideas and Programs

There are so many ways to include training. We need to be flexible and willing to try out new ideas. You might want to set out play days where you try something new and fun based around gymnastics, calisthenics, or more group class-based training like Zumba or boxing circuits. At the end of the day, if we can maintain some strength and size using training methods we have discussed, great, but ultimately we should be using exercise to keep us fit, healthy, and engaged in good developing habits. If you need to try something different to stay engaged, then go for it. The barbell will be waiting for you whenever this bullshit is over. It's going nowhere.

4-Week Structured Program

This program splits into three tiers:

Novice: For people who are either newer to training, have minimal equipment, or will struggle with more ballistic training.

Intermediate: For people who have more equipment available, have a higher training age, or who can engage in more ballistic/plyometric based training.

Limited equipment: For people who have a bar, a rack, and limited weight, but can do a hypertrophy program with some more power-based/ballistic based elements.

 DOWNLOAD PROGRAM

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Two Week Sample

Below are session examples using minimal equipment (stuff lying around the house, some bands, bodyweight):

Week 1

Session 1

 

A - Squat w bag - 30-second constant tension

B - Press up w bag - 30-second constant tension

C - Pull up - 30-second AMRAP

D - Bag or KB Swing - 30-sec constant tension

E - Plank w bag - 30 seconds

F - 60-second rest

8 Rounds

 

Session 2

 

A - Lat raise w water bottles or light band or bag - 25 reps

B - Upright row w water bottles or light band or bag - 25 reps

C - Curl w water bottles or light band or bag - 25 reps

D - Push down w band or OH Ext w water bottles or light band or bag - 25 reps

E - Lunge pump - 25 reps EL

F - KB, Heavy bottle or Bag swing - 25 reps

As Many Rounds As Possible - 20-minute time cap

 

Session 3

 

30-minute Yoga Flow

 

Session 4

 

A - Split squat w weight or bodyweight - 1 set to failure each leg

B - Handstand press up - 1 set to failure

C - Nordic Trap legs in bed, sofa or use partner - 1 set to failure

D - Inverted row or Chin-up - 1 set to failure

E - Reverse crunch - 20 reps

F - 120-second rest

3 Rounds

 

Session 5

 

A - Front raise w water bottles or light band or bag - 25 reps

B - Banded face pull w light band or bag - 25 reps

C - Body curl w rope, straps, TRX, towel- 25 reps

D - Dips using Tables, chairs, bench - 25 reps

E - Step up using couch, chair, steps - 25 reps EL

F - Good morning w bag on head or heavy band - 25 reps

 

Equipment Level 2

These sessions use some weights: Dumbbells, bands, and kettlebells.

 

Week 1

 

Session 1

A - Goblet squat x 10

B - Swing x 20

C - Weighted press up x 10

D - Renegade or One arm row x 10

90 seconds rest -

6 Rounds

 

Session 2

 

A - Weighted Split Squat (rear leg elevated) x 10 EL

B - Single leg deadlift x 10 EL

C - Single leg hip thrust w weight x 10 EL

D - Cuban press x 10

E - Banded Arc x 10

F - Lu Raise x 10

120 seconds rest -

3 Rounds

 

Session 3

 

20-minute Yoga Flow

 

Session 4

 

A - Tempo Goblet squat (3-0-3) x 10

B - Tempo good morning (hug weight- 3-0-3) x 10

C - Tempo press up (3-0-3, weighted if you can) x 10

D - Chin or pull up -

90 seconds rest -

6 Rounds

 

Session 5

 

A - Walking overhead lunge - x 10 EL

B - Cossack Squat x 10 EL

C - Weighted single-leg hip bridge x 30 sec each leg

D - Rev fly x 10

E - Curl x 20

F - OH ext x 20

120 seconds rest -

5 Rounds

 

Session 6

 

40-minute Yoga Flow

 

Equipment Level 3

These sessions use a barbell rack, weights, and enough weight for high volume GPP work.

 

Week 1 

Session 1

 

High bar or Front Squat - 3x10 @ RPE 6

Floor or feet up bench press - 3x10 @ RPE 6

Pendlay row or inverted row - 3x10 @ RPE 6

 

Session 2

 

Snatch grip deadlift or RDL - 3x10 @ RPE 6

Overhead press - 3x10 @ RPE 6

Chin up or Pull up (banded if needed) - 3x10 @ RPE 6

 

Session 3

 

 

*Keep rest limited.

Barbell split squat - 3x10 EL @ RPE 6

Single leg deadlift - 3x10 EL @ RPE 6

Press up s/s Inverted row - 3x10

DB Facedown plate angels - 3x10

DB Rev fly - 3x10

Single leg abductions - 3x10 EL

 

Session 4 

 

Pause High bar or Front Squat - 3x10 @ RPE 6

Close grip Floor or feet up bench press - 3x10 @ RPE 6

Pendlay row or inverted row - 3x10 @ RPE 6

 

Session 5

 

Sumo deadlift or good morning - 3x10 @ RPE 6

Overhead press OR high incline bench press - 3x10 @ RPE 6

Chin up or Pull up (banded if needed change grip from session 2) - 3x10 @ RPE 6

 

Session 6  

 

Step up or Walking lunge - 3x10 EL @ RPE 6

Barbell hip thrust - 3x10 EL @ RPE 6

Weighted deadbug - 3x10

Y-T-Ws - 3x10

Single leg abductions - 3x10 EL

 

Session 7

 

30-minute Yoga Flow

 

Week 2 

Session 1

 

Warm-up

BW squat x 5

Lunge pump x 5 EL

Lying straight leg lift x 5 EL

Calf raises x 10 (slow tempo)

 

1 - Skipping x 1 min / 1 min off x 3 OR Pogo jump x 10 / 1 min off x 3

2 - Vertical jump x 5 - 2 min rest x 5

3 - Bound x 3 - 2 min rest x 3

4 - Clap press ups x 5 - 1 min rest x 5

5 - Throw for height - object weighing 3-10kg depending on strength - x 5 - 2 min rest - 3 sets

6 - Single leg bound (hop and stop) x 3 EL - 2 min rest x 3

 

Session 2

 

 

*Add weighted backpack.

Warm-up - 3 rounds

Scap push up x 10

Shoulder taps x 10 ES

Scap rows or pulls ups (if you can) x 10

Side plank arms-length x 15 sec ES

 

A - Press up (wide grip) x 1 rep shy of failure, 30 seconds rest, Close grip press up x failure

B - Split squat rear leg elevated x 10 ES (2-0-2 tempo)

C - Single leg thruster x 10 ES (2-0-2 tempo)

D - Inverted row (wide grip) x 1 rep shy failure, 30 seconds rest,  Underhand or close grip x failure

E - Nordic x 1 shy of F OR Adductor plank x F ES

F - Calf raises double leg x 20, no rest, Single leg calf raise x 10 EL

3 min rest - 3 rounds

 

Session 3

 

30-minutes Pilates

 

Session 4 

 

Warm-up -

BW squat x 5

Lunge pump x 5 EL

Lying straight leg lift x 5 EL

Calf raises x 10 (slow tempo)

 

1 - Skipping x 1 min / 1 min off x 3 OR Pogo jump x 10 / 1 min off x 3

2 - Repeat vertical jump effort x 5 - 2 min rest x 5

3 - Repeat Bound x 3 - 2 min rest x 3

4 - Clap press ups x 5 - 1 min rest x 5

5 - Throw for height - object weighing 3-10kg depending on strength - x 5 - 2 min rest - 3 sets

6 - Single leg bound (hop and stop) x 3 EL - 2 min rest x 3

 

Session 5

 

Warm-up - 3 rounds

Scap push up x 10

Shoulder taps x 10 ES

Scap rows or pulls ups (if you can) x 10

Side plank arms length x 15 sec ES

 

A - Press up (from a deficit) x 1 rep shy of failure, 30 seconds rest, Press up to block x failure

B - Step up x 10 ES (2-0-2 tempo)

C - Single leg thruster, straight leg x 10 ES (2-0-2 tempo)

D - Inverted Row (wide grip) x 1 rep shy failure, 30 seconds rest,  Underhand or close grip x failure

E - Nordic x 1 shy of F OR Adductor plank x F ES

F - Calf raises double leg x 10, no rest, Single leg calf raise x 10 EL - 2-0-2 tempo

 

OR Oclussion session

 

Press up from deficit - 15 reps / 90 sec off x 3

Inverted row (underhand if possible) - 10 reps / 90s x 3

Split squat - 15 reps / 90s off x 3

Bag hamstring curl x 30 / 90s off x 3

OH Ext x 30 / 90s off x 3

Concentration curl x 30 / 90s off x 3

 

Session 6 

 

Yoga for Lifters

 

Session 7 

 

*With water bottles or a bag full of books.

Curl and press x 10

Upright row x 10

Lat raise x 10

Rev fly x 10

OH ext x 10

5 rounds minimal rest.

 

Equipment level 2

These sessions use some weights, dumbbells, bands, and kettlebells.

 

Week 2  

Session 1

 

Warm-up -

BW squat x 5

Lunge pump x 5 EL

Lying straight leg lift x 5 EL

Calf raises x 10 (slow tempo)

 

1 - Skipping x 1 min / 1 min off x 3 OR Pogo jump x 10 / 1 min off x 3

2 - BB, KB or DB Squat jump x 5 - 2 min rest x 5

3 - Bound x 3 - 2 min rest x 3

4 - Clap press ups x 5 - 1 min rest x 5

5 - Clap pull up x 5 - 1 min rest x 5

6 - Borzov hops (jumps from BSS position) x 5 EL - 2 min rest x 3

 

Session 2

*Add weighted backpack.

Warm-up - 3 rounds

Scap push up x 10

Shoulder taps x 10 ES

Scap angles x 10

Banded rev fly x 10

Side plank arms length x 15 sec ES

 

A - Weighted Press up x 1 rep shy of failure, Strip weight, x 1 rep shy failure, BW x failure

B - Weighted Split squat rear leg elevated x 10 ES (2-0-2 tempo)

C - Weighted Single leg thruster x 10 ES (2-0-2 tempo)

D - SA Row or renegade row x 10 EA, 30-sec rest, inverted row to failure

E - Nordic x 1 shy of F OR Adductor plank x F ES

F - Weighted Calf raise double leg x 20, no rest, Single leg calf raise x 10 EL

3 min rest - 3 rounds

 

Session 3

45-minute Pilates

 

Session 4 

Warm-up

Bw squat x 5

Lunge pump x 5 EL

Lying straight leg lift x 5 EL

Calf raises x 10 (slow tempo)

 

1 - Skipping x 1 min / 1 min off x 3 OR Pogo jump x 10 / 1 min off x 3

2 - Repeat Squat jump effort x 5 - 2 min rest x 5

3 - Repeat Bound x 3 - 2 min rest x 3

4 - Clap press ups x 5 s/s Weighted throw for distance x 3 - 1 min rest x 5

5 - Throw for height - object weighing 3-10kg depending on strength - x 5 - 2 min rest - 3 sets

6 - Single leg bound (hop and stop) x 3 EL - 2 min rest x 3

 

Session 5

 

Warm-up - 3 rounds

Scap push up x 10

Shoulder taps x 10 ES

Scap angels x 10

Banded rev fly x 10

Side plank arms length x 15 sec ES

 

A - Weighted Press up (from a deficit) x 1 rep shy of failure, 30 seconds rest, Weighted Press up to block x failure

B - DB or KB Step up x 10 ES (2-0-2 tempo)

C - DB or KB Single leg thruster, straight leg x 10 ES (2-0-2 tempo)

D - Inverted Row (wide grip) x 1 rep shy failure, 30 seconds rest,  DB or KB (ideally chest supported) row x f

E - Nordic x 1 shy of F OR Adductor plank x F ES

F - DB or KB Calf raise double leg x 10, no rest, Single leg calf raise x 10 EL - 2-0-2 tempo

 

OR Oclussion session 

 

DB Press x 30, 90 sec rest x 3

DB Curl and press, 90-sec rest x 3

Weighted split squat x 15 EL, 90-sec rest x 3

Single leg DL x 10 EL, 90-sec rest x 3

DB incline or hammer curl x 20, 90-sec rest x 3

OH Ext or rolling DB press x 20, 90-sec rest x 3

 

Session 6 

 

Yoga for Lifters

Session 7  

 

Gobet squat x 10

KB Swing x 10

Lunge x 5 EL

Curl and press x 10

Rev fly x 10

Kick back x 10

5 laps minimal rest

 

Equipment Level 3

These sessions use a barbell rack, weights, and enough weight for high volume GPP work.

 

Week 2

Session 1

 

Warm-up -

Bw squat x 5

Lunge pump x 5 EL

Lying straight leg lift x 5 EL

Calf raises x 10 (slow tempo)

 

BB pogo jump x 10 x 3

Jump squat x 5 x 5

Push press x 5 x 5

High pull x 5 x 5

Clap press up x 5 x 5

 

Session 2

 

Warm-up - 3 rounds

Scap push up x 10

Shoulder taps x 10 ES

Scap angels x 10

Banded rev fly x 10

Side plank arms length x 15 sec ES

 

Squat or front squat - 4x10 @ RPE 6-7

Snatch grip deadlift or RDL - 4x10 @ RPE 6-7

Overhead press - 4x10 @ RPE 6-7

Chin up or Pull up (banded if needed) - 4x10 @ RPE 6-7

 

Session 3

 

*Keep rest limited.

Barbell split squat - 4x10 EL @ RPE 6-7

Single leg deadlift - 4x10 EL @ RPE 6-7

Floor press s/s Inverted row - 4x10

DB Facedown plate angels - 4x10

DB Rev fly - 4x10

Single leg abductions - 3x10 EL

 

Session 4  

 

30-minutes Pilates

 

Session 5

 

Warm-up

BW squat x 5

Lunge pump x 5 EL

Lying straight leg lift x 5 EL

Calf raises x 10 (slow tempo)

 

BB pogo jump x 10 x 3

Jump squat x 5 x 5

Push press x 5 x 5

High pull x 5 x 5

Clap press up x 5 x 5

 

Session 6 

 

Warm-up - 3 rounds

Scap push up x 10

Shoulder taps x 10 ES

Scap angels x 10

Banded rev fly x 10

Side plank arms length x 15 sec ES

 

Squat or front squat - 4x10 @ RPE 6-7

Snatch grip deadlift or RDL - 4x10 @ RPE 6-7

Overhead press - 4x10 @ RPE 6-7

Chin up or Pull up (banded if needed) - 4x10 @ RPE 6-7

Weighted press up s/s Inverted row - 4x10 @ RPE 6-7

 

Session 7 

 

30-minute Yoga Flow

 

Conditioning Options

Day 1 

 

Run Option

Warm-up

Calf raises x 10

Hamstring floss x 10

Leg swing (adductor) x 10

Leg Swing (hamstring) x 10

X 3

 

4 min moderate pace

2 min walk

X 4

3 min easy jog or walk to cool down

 

BW Option

Block run (roundhouse or round estate)

Down up x 10

Mountain climbers x 20

Plank x 60 sec

6 rounds no rest

 

Barbell Option

Beast circuit (empty bar or light weight)

6x Deadlift

6x high pull

6x front squat

6x push press

6x back squat

6x bent over row

Block run

6 rounds, no rest.

 

Day 2

 

Run Option 

Warm-up

Calf raises x 10

Hamstring floss x 10

Leg swing (adductor) x 10

Leg Swing (hamstring) x 10

X 3

 

1 min hard run

1 min walk

X 12

3 min easy jog or walk to cool down

 

BW Option

Burpees - 30 sec as you can - 30 sec off x 6

4 min rest

X 3

 

Day 3

Rest Day - 10,000 step walk, 40-60 min east bike ride, yoga or Pilates

 

Day 4

 

Run Option 

Warm-up

Calf raises x 10

Hamstring floss x 10

Leg swing (adductor) x 10

Leg Swing (hamstring) x 10

X 3

 

3 min moderate pace

3 min walk

X 6

3 min easy jog or walk to cool down

 

BW Option

Squat jump x 5

Bw squat x 10

Walking lunge x 8 EL

Bicycle crunch x 20

8 rounds no rest

 

Barbell Option

Girthy circuit (empty bar or light weight)

Barbell thruster (squat into press) x 10

Push Press x 10

Back Squat x 10

Jump squat x 10

BN push press x 10

BB high pull x 10

Burpees over bar x 10

5 rounds no rest

 

Day 5

 

Run Option 

Warm-up

Calf raises x 10

Hamstring floss x 10

Leg swing (adductor) x 10

Leg Swing (hamstring) x 10

X 3

 

30 min hard run

30-sec rest

X 8

2 min rest

X 3

3 min easy jog or walk to cool down

 

BW Option

Down up shuttle - down up on the line every 5m (0-5-0-10-0-15-0-20-0-25-0)

45-sec max effort

3 min 15-sec rest

X 2-6 (depending on fitness)

 

Day 6

 

Rest Day - 10,000 step walk, 40-60 min east bike ride, yoga or Pilates

Day 7

 

Rest Day - 10,000 step walk, 40-60 min east bike ride, Yoga or Pilates


Header image courtesy of zabelin © 123rf.com


Marc Keys is a strength and conditioning coach and business owner. Marc's current full-time job is running Cast Iron Strength—a strength and conditioning online service and training facility in Edinburgh Scotland where he delivers strength and conditioning coaching both in-person and online to over 100 powerlifters, strongman athletes, weightlifters, and athletes from many other sports. Before opening his facility and moving to Cast Iron Strength full-time, Marc worked in professional rugby from 2013 - 2017 with Scotland and Edinburgh rugby. Prior to working in professional sport, Marc worked for the Scotland Institute of Sport where he was involved in the physical preparation of around 60 Olympic and commonwealth athletes from over 20 different sports, many of whom went to medal for Team Scotland or Great Britain. As a powerlifter, Marc has been lifting in the IPF for twelve years. He has competition best raw lifts of 645-pound squat, 465-pound bench press, and 675-pound deadlift at a bodyweight of 248 pounds. Marc also holds a master's degree in strength and conditioning and a bachelor's degree in sports science. If you would like to contact Marc, email speedpowerperformance@gmail.com.

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